Third book: Vote now open

to be determined

The poll for the first book is now open and you can vote at the bottom of this post. Please vote using this poll rather than tweeting. Vote closes 6pm GMT Sunday 19th January.

To help you choose here is some blurb for each nomination…

The Number Devil – Hans Magnus Enzensberger

Twelve-year-old Robert hates his maths teacher. He sets his class boring problems and won’t let them use their calculators. Then in his dreams Robert meets the Number Devil who brings the subject magically to life. The Number Devil knows how to make maths devilishly simple.

A Mathematician’s Apology – GH Hardy

A Mathematician’s Apology is the famous essay by British mathematician G. H. Hardy. It concerns the aesthetics of mathematics with some personal content, and gives the layman an insight into the mind of a working mathematician. Indeed, this book is often considered one of the best insights into the mind of a working mathematician written for the layman

Why Do Buses Come In Threes – Rob Eastaway/ Jeremy Wyndham

Fascinating questions are answered in this entertaining and highly informative book, which is ideal for anyone wanting to remind themselves – or discover for the first time – that maths is relevant to almost everything we do.

Love and Math – Edward Frenkel

What if you had to take an art class in which you were only taught how to paint a fence? What if you were never shown the paintings of van Gogh and Picasso, weren’t even told they existed? Alas, this is how math is taught, and so for most of us it becomes the intellectual equivalent of watching paint dry.

In Love and Math, renowned mathematician Edward Frenkel reveals a side of math we’ve never seen, suffused with all the beauty and elegance of a work of art. In this heartfelt and passionate book, Frenkel shows that mathematics, far from occupying a specialist niche, goes to the heart of all matter, uniting us across cultures, time, and space.

The Simpsons and Their Mathematical Secrets – Simon Singh

Using specific episodes as jumping off points – from ‘Bart the Genius’ to ‘Treehouse of Horror VI’ – Simon Singh brings to life the most intriguing and meaningful mathematical concepts, ranging from pi and the paradox of infinity to the origins of numbers and the most profound outstanding problems that haunt today’s generation of mathematicians. In the process, he introduces us to The Simpsons’ brilliant writing team – the likes of Ken Keeler, Al Jean, Jeff Westbrook, and Stewart Burns – who are not only comedy geniuses, but who also hold advanced degrees in mathematics. This eye-opening book will give anyone who reads it an entirely new mathematical insight into the most successful show in television history

Euclid’s Window – Leonard Mlodinow

Euclid’s Window Ever since Pythagoras hatched a ‘little scheme’ to invent a set of rules describing the entire universe, scientists and mathematicians have tried to seek order in the cosmos. In this title, the author takes us on a journey through 3,000 years of genius and geometry, introducing the people who revolutionized the way we see the world around us.

A Disappearing Number – Simon McBurney

Winner of the 2008 Olivier Award for Best New Play

“With touching emotion and unnerving disquietude, “A Disappearing Number” forces the spectator to consider the fact of love, death and belonging, within the space of his or her own personal universe.”–“New Statesman”

A man mourns the loss of his lover, a mathematician mourns her own fate. A businessman travels from Los Angeles to Chennai pursuing the future; a physicist in CERN looks for it too. The mathematician G.H. Hardy seeks to comprehend the ideas of the genius Srinivasa Ramanujan in the chilly English surroundings of Cambridge during the First World War. Ramanujan looks to create some of the most complex mathematical patterns of all time.

Get Voting!

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